Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos. KELLIEGRAM BINDING, Gottlob Heinrich Holloway Leutemann, E. W., Henrik.
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos
Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos

Reynard the Fox, a Poem in Twelve Cantos

Dresden, Leipzig & London: Published for the proprietors by A.H. Payne [&] W. French, 1852. Item #04833

A Superb Kelliegram 'Presentation' Binding

[KELLIEGRAM binding]. Reynard The Fox, A Poem in Twelve Cantos. Translated from the German by E.W. Holloway. With thirty-seven engravings on steel, after designs by H. Leutemann. Dresden, Leipzig & London: Published for the proprietors by A.H. Payne [&] W. French, [1852].

First edition of Holloway’s translation of the classic fable.

Large quarto (10 5/8 x 8 1/8 inches; 270 x 206 mm). xiv, 81, [1, printer’s slug] pp. Thirty-seven black and white steel engraved plates including frontispiece and pictorial title, all with tissue guards. Text printed in double column.

Bound ca. 1910 by Kelly & Sons (stamp-signed "Kelly & Sons Binders" on rear turn-in) in full russet goat with gilt-ruled border, floral corner pieces presenting a curvilinear panel of inlaid green foliage and golden lilies along a gilt strand with fox head corner-pieces in gilt to both covers. Front cover with gilt lettered presentation. Spine with five gilt-dotted raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in compartments. Gilt ruled board edges and turn ins, green silk endleaves, all edges gilt. Front joint expertly and almost invisibly repaired. A very attractive binding.

Front cover lettered in gilt "Presented to Charles Carroll Morgan by the Fortnightly Club of Nashua in recognition of his distinguished services to the club from the time of its foundation in 1887. December 1910."

Nashua Telegraph December 20th, 1910 newspaper cutting regarding the presentation of this book to Charles Carroll Morgan affixed to front blank (text below).

Reynard the Fox is the subject of a literary cycle of allegorical French, Dutch, English, and German fables largely concerned with Reynard, an anthropomorphic red fox and trickster figure. The figure of Reynard is thought to have originated in Alsace-Lorraine folklore from where it spread to France, the Low Countries, and Germany. An extensive treatment of the character is the Old French Le Roman de Renart written by Pierre de Saint-Cloud around 1170, which sets the typical setting. Reynard has been summoned to the court of king Noble, or Leo, the Lion, to answer charges brought against him by Isengrim the Wolf.Reynard influenced Ben Jonson's Volpone, was used by Nietzsche's in Twilight of the Idols. and Goethe treated Reynard in his Reineke Fuchs.

“…hero of several medieval European cycles of versified animal tales that satirize contemporary human society. Though Reynard is sly, amoral, cowardly, and self-seeking, he is still a sympathetic hero whose cunning is a necessity for survival. He symbolizes the triumph of craft over brute strength, usually personified by Isengrim, the greedy and dull-witted wolf. Some of cyclic stories collected around him, such as those telling of the wolf or bear fishing with his tail through a hole in the ice, are found throughout the world; others, like that of the sick lion cured by the wolf’s skin, are derived from Greco-Roman sources. The cycle arose in the area between Flanders and Germany in the 10th and 11th centuries when clerks began to forge Latin beast epics out of popular tales… The main literary tradition of Reynard the Fox descends from the extant French ‘branches’ of the Roman de Renart (about 30 in number, nearly 40,000 lines of verse). The facetious portrayal of rustic life, the camel as a papal legate speaking broken French, the animals riding on horses and recounting elaborate dreams all suggest the atmosphere of 13th-century France” (Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of Literature).

Gottlob Heinrich (Henrik) Leutemann (1824-1905) was a German artist and book illustrator. He was born in Leipzig and studied there. He produced lithographs for instructional posters. In the 1850s, he worked on pictures of animals for a zoological Atlas. Some of his drawings include Ankunft Junger Leoparden bei Hagenbeck in Hamburg ("A box of young leopards arrives at Hagenbeck's Animal Show in Hamburg"), Tierkauf in Afrika ("Buying animals in Africa"), Riesenschlangen-Käfig im Zoologischen Garten Hamburg (Giant snakes' cage in the Hamburg Zoo), and Manatees ("Manatees"). Hagenbeck's Tierpark still brings visitors to Hamburg.

Nashua Telegraph, Dec. 20, 1910

"Handsome Gift To Mr. Morgan, Retiring President of Fortnightly Club.

The Fortnightly club met Monday evening with Dr. and Mrs. Francis S. Allen at the Belgravia. After the reading of the minutes the Rev. Wm. Porter Niles, as president of the club, made an address of appreciation of the services of Mr. Charles C. Morgan to the club from the day in 1887 when he suggested the organization of the club with nine other well known citizens of whom but three are now living, Rev. Dr. Richardson, Rev. Henry Parker of Woburn, Mass., and Mr. Morgan, - sent invitations to 40 other men and women to form the club, to the time when he feels that he must lay down the presidency of the club. Rev. Mr. Niles referred to the very valuable services of Mr. Morgan in arranging the programs, in stimulating members to make research, in leading in discussions and in general in maintaining high ideals for the club. In closing Rev. Mr. Niles in behalf of the club presented Mr. Morgan with a richly bound and beautifully illustrated copy of the old German story of Reynard the Fox, a story which in one form or another has held the interest of Europe from the twelfth century and which was among the earliest books printed in England by Caxton in 1481. On the front cover of the book was inscribed in gold letters these words: ‘Presented to Charles Carrol Morgan by the Fortnightly Club of Nashua in Recognition of His Distinguished Services to the Club from the Time of its Foundation in 1887 to December, 1910.’ Mr. Morgan replied with words of appreciation and upon request added a few remarks as to the original members of the club and their work for the club in its early days. The regular program of the evening followed, Mr. Morgan speaking of Alaska as a field for civilization and also of its agricultural and grazing resources and Dr. W. Harry Weston reading a paper on its “attractiveness to Tourists” Rev. Dr. Cyrus Richardson and Mr. John E. Cotton gave personal recollections of travel in Alaska. The meeting closed at a late hour."

Price: $3,500.00