Golden Legend, The. Sidney N. METEYARD, illustrator, Henry Wadsworth LONGFELLOW.
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The
Golden Legend, The

Golden Legend, The

New York: Hodder & Stoughton / George H. Doran Co., 1910. Item #02720

A Pristine Copy

LONGFELLOW, Henry Wadsworth. [METEYARD, Sidney N., illustrator]. The Golden Legend. With Illustrations by Sidney N. Meteyard. New York: Hodder & Stoughton / George H. Doran Co., n.d. [1910].

First American trade edition. Quarto (9 5/8 x 7 in; 244 x 179 mm). viii, 153, [1] pp. Twenty-five tipped-in color plates with captioned tissue guards.

Publisher's gilt- and blind-stamped cloth. An astonishing copy, very fine in the original glassine dust jacket (a bit of edgewear) and publisher's original box (archivally repaired at joints).

British painter and art teacher Sidney Harold Meteyard (1808-1947) worked in stained glass, enamels and tempera, as a book illustrator and designer in the Pre-Raphaelite style of the Birmingham Group, and was further influenced by Edward Burne-Jones and the Arts and Crafts Movement.

A lyric drama in verse, "the Golden Legend is a framework including a series of tableaux illustrative of life and manners, principally in Germany, at some period of the middle ages between the first and last crusade. The story by which these tableaux are connected is that a certain Prince Henry of Hoheneck, labouring under an apparently incurable disease, is informed by the doctors of Salerno that he may be cured by the blood of a maiden voluntarily giving her life for his. He is tempted by Lucifer, appearing to him under various disguises, to avail himself of the generosity of a village maiden named Elsie, the daughter of one of his tenants, with whom he takes refuge on being expelled by some not very intelligible priestly process from his castle and princedom on the Rhine. The pair travel together to Salerno, discourse on the various objects of interest they meet on their journey, and finally arrive at Salerno; where the Prince's selfishness gives way before a sudden impulse, and Elsie, becomes Princess of Hoheneck" (The Spectator, Jan. 3, 1852).

Price: $650.00