Bhagavad Gita. The Song Celestial; The Sanskrit Text Translated into English Verse by Sir Edwin Arnold. With an Introduction by Shri Sri Prakasa. Illustrated with Paintings by Y.G. Srimati

With Fifteen Mounted Color Plates by Srimati

[BHAGAVAD GITA]. Bhagavad Gita. The Song Celestial. The Sanskrit Text Translated into English Verse by Sir Edwin Arnold. With an Introduction by Shri Sri Prakasa. Illustrated with Paintings by Y.G. Srimati. Bombay: Printed for the Members of The Limited Editions Club, 1964.

Limited to 1,500 copies signed by Y.G. Srimati, this being no. 542.

Quarto (10 x 7 inches; 254 x 179 mm.). 154 pp. Fifteen tipped-in color plates.

Publisher's hand-woven multicolored, patterned Indian silk, front cover with a gold label lettered in black. A fine copy in the original glassine wrapper. Housed in the publisher's green felt-lined red cloth chemise, decorted in gilt, original silk ties.

The Bhagavad Gita is a 700-verse, 18-chapter religious text within the Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma Parva chapters 25–42. A core text of Hinduism and Indian philosophy, often referred to simply as "the Gita", it is a summation of many aspects of the Vedic, Yogic, Vedantic and Tantric philosophies. The Bhagavad Gita, meaning "Song of the Lord", refers to itself as an 'Upanishad' and is sometimes called Gitopanishad. During the message of the Gita, Krishna proclaims that he is an Avatar, or a Bhagavat, an appearance of the all-embracing God. To help Arjuna believe this, he reveals to him his divine form which is described as timeless and leaves Arjuna shaking with awe and fear.

There is an example of the Indian artist Y.G. Srimati (1927-2007) work in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Limited Editions Club Bibliography, 369. Item #03674

Out of stock

See all items by