The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle. Arthur RACKHAM, Henry C. SHELLEY.
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle
The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle

The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle

London: "Westminster Gazette", 1895. Item #04414

" We all love great men ; love, venerate, and bow down submissive before great men:
Nay, can we honestly bow down to anything else?''

[RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. [SHELLEY, Henry C.] The Homes and Haunts of Thomas Carlyle. London: "Westminster Gazette", 1895.

First edition. Octavo (7 1/2 x 5 inches; 191 x 127 mm.). xx, 148 pp. With one black and white text drawing by Rackham on p. 128. Frontispiece and fifty-seven illustrations including a half-page line drawing by Arthur Rackham "The Kitchen". "There may be other work of his that is not signed [in particular the illustrations on pages 88 & 129]" (Latimore & Haskell).

Publisher's dark blue cloth, spine lettered in gilt, top edge gilt, others uncut. Spine faded, still an excellent copy of this elusive Rackham title.

""In future years," wrote Carlyle's biographer, "in future centuries, strangers will come from distant lands, from America, from Australia, from New Zealand, from every isle or continent where the English language is spoken, to see the house where Carlyle was born, to see the green turf under which his dust is lying." Mr. Froude's prediction has been verified at an earlier date than he assigned for it. It is only 14 years since Carlyle died, and already his birthplace has become a place of pilgrimage for men and women in all parts of the English-speaking world. The little house in Ecclefechan where the author of "Sartor Resartus" was born is visited by many hundreds of tourists every year. The other homes and haunts of his early life - the spots where he gazed on "those hues of gold and azure," and looked "at the fair illuminated letters with an eye for their gilding," are eagerly sought out by readers of "Heroes and Hero- Worship." The centenary of his birth has been the occasion of the purchase and dedication to the public for ever of the famous house in Chelsea, where the historian of the French Revolution, of Cromwell and of Friedrich did his life's work and lived out his life's drama." (Preface dated December 4th, 1895.).

Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) was a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, translator, historian, mathematician, and teacher. Considered one of the most important social commentators of his time, he presented many lectures during his lifetime with certain acclaim in the Victorian era. One of those conferences resulted in his famous work On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History where he explains that the key role in history lies in the actions of the "Great Man", claiming that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men".
A respected historian, his 1837 book The French Revolution: A History was the inspiration for Charles Dickens' 1859 novel A Tale of Two Cities, and remains popular today. Carlyle's 1836 Sartor Resartus is a notable philosophical novel.
A great polemicist, Carlyle coined the term "the dismal science" for economics. He also wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopædia, and his Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question (1849) remains controversial. Once a Christian, Carlyle lost his faith while attending the University of Edinburgh, later adopting a form of deism.
In mathematics, he is known for the Carlyle circle, a method used in quadratic equations and for developing ruler-and-compass constructions of regular polygons.

Latmore & Haskell, p.6; Riall, p.9.

Price: $350.00