Treasure Island. N. C. WYETH, Robert Louis STEVENSON.
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island
Treasure Island

Treasure Island

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1911. Item #04594

First N.C. Wyeth llustrated Edition of Treasure Island
Finely Bound by MacDonald of New York

WYETH, N.C., illustrator. STEVENSON, Robert Louis. Treasure Island. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1911.

First Wyeth Illustrated Edition, first issue.

[i-vi], vii-xiv, [1, blank], [1, map], 273, [1, blank] pp. Color pictorial title-page (included in pagination) and fourteen full-page color plates, all with captioned tissue-guards. Partially uncut, pp. 113/114 poorly opened affecting blank margins only. Otherwise a fine, clean copy.

Bound ca. 1911 by MacDonald of New York (stamp-signed in gilt on rear turn-in). Full red crushed levant morocco, covers ruled in gilt with corner gilt fleurons , front cover with a central skull and crossbones design. Spine with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt-ruled board-edges and turn-ins, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt, others uncut. Original front cover and spine bound in at end. Housed in the original felt-lined, red cloth slipcase.

Newell Convers Wyeth was born on October 22, 1882, in Needham, Massachusetts. Growing up on a farm, he developed a deep love of nature. His mother, the daughter of Swiss immigrants, encouraged his early artistic inclinations in the face of opposition from his father, a descendant of the first Wyeth to arrive in the New World in the mid-17th century... On the advice of two friends, artists Clifford Ashley and Henry Peck, Wyeth decided to travel to Wilmington, Delaware, in October 1902, to join the Howard Pyle School of Art... Following Pyle's maxim to paint only from experience, Wyeth made three trips between 1904 and 1906 to the American West. He spent much of these trips simply absorbing the Western experience which allowed him to paint images that would place him among the top illustrators of his day. By 1907, Wyeth was heralded in Outing Magazine as "one of our greatest, if not our greatest, painter of American outdoor life." His pictures had appeared in many of the most popular magazines of the period, such as Century, Harper's Monthly, Ladies' Home Journal, McClure's, Outing, and Scribner's...

"In 1911, the publishing house of Charles Scribner's Sons engaged Wyeth to illustrate Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, his first commission in Scribner's popular series of classic stories... The success of Treasure Island insured Wyeth a long career with Scribner's, illustrating in succeeding years many classic stories."

“Treasure Island established itself as a classic, drawing plaudits from the widest range of literary sensibilities. In 1890 W.B. Yeats wrote to tell [Stevenson] that the book was the only one in which his seafaring grandfather had ever taken any pleasure and that he reread it on his deathbed with infinite satisfaction. Jack London, in so many ways RLS’s true spiritual heir, declared: ‘His Treasure Island will be a classic to go down with Robinson Crusoe, Through the Looking Glass and The Jungle Books’’’ (Frank McLynn, Robert Louis Stevenson, p. 203).

Allen & Allen, p. 218.

Price: $1,250.00