La Rigolbochomanie. VERNIER, harles.
La Rigolbochomanie
La Rigolbochomanie
La Rigolbochomanie
La Rigolbochomanie
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La Rigolbochomanie

La Rigolbochomanie

Paris: Au Bureau du Charivari et chez Martinet, 1850. Item #04753

"The idea of it is to dance as wildly, as noisily, as furiously as you can;
expose yourself as much as possible if you are a woman;
and kick as high as you can, no matter which sex you belong to." (Mark Twain)

VERNIER, Charles. La Rigolbochomanie Croquis Lithographiques & Chorégraphiques. Par Charles Vernier. Paris: Au Bureau du Charivari et chez Martinet, [1850].

First edition. Folio (13 1/16 x 10 inches; 332 x 254 mm.). Hand colored lithograph pictorial title and thirty superb hand colored lithograph plates. Plate 13 with neatly repaired tear in lower blank margin, some minimal marginal soiling and toning.

Mid-twentieth century dark green cloth over blue marbled boards with vellum tips, spine ruled and lettered in gilt. Neat contemporary ink gift? inscription on front blank dated 24/12/1860. An excellent copy of this extremely scarce title.

Charles Vernier's La Rigolbochomanie, is a collection of satirical cartoons that took its title from the Parisian furor over the dancer Mademoiselle Rigolboche. Called the "queen of the can-can" by dance historian Ivor Guest, she was perhaps better known for her scandalous antics than for the refinement of her dancing.

OCLC locates seventeen copies in libraries and institutions worldwide, but from the records all of these appear to be uncolored examples.

The Can-Can, or Cancan as in the original French, is a high-energy, physically demanding dance that became a popular music-hall dance in the 1840s, continuing in popularity in French cabaret to this day. Originally danced by both sexes, it is now traditionally associated with a chorus line of female dancers. The main features of the dance are the vigorous manipulation of skirts and petticoats, along with high kicks, splits, and cartwheels.

"That is the Can-can. The idea of it is to dance as wildly, as noisily, as furiously as you can; expose yourself as much as possible if you are a woman; and kick as high as you can, no matter which sex you belong to. There is no word of exaggeration in this. Any of the staid, respectable, aged people who were there that night can testify to the truth of that statement. There were a good many such people present. I suppose French morality is not of that strait-laced description which is shocked at trifles." (Mark Twain - The Innocents Abroad, 1869).

Charles Vernier, (1813-1892) was a French artist, caricaturist and lithographer. He worked for Le Charivari and published several illustrated collections. His works are featured in several Museums including The Carnavalet Museum; The Galliera Museum of Fashion in Paris; The National Library of France; The Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco.

The Lithographs of Charles Vernier, of which a large part have been published in the Le Charivari, deal with several themes: The first theme concerns the political life of the nineteenth century, rich in national and international events. His charges against politicians and against censorship earned him stays at the Pelagie prison. His caricatures of the English, Austrians, Prussians, and Russians are sometimes fierce. To note the album "The Good Austrians" realized jointly with Honoré Daumier and the French images: "the double-faced policy of England in the questions of Poland and Schleswig-Holstein". The second theme concerns society in the nineteenth century : its gaze is carried, with a spiritual irony on the manners of the time. His lithographs are grouped in series: News, grisettes, public balls, the masked ball, the opera ball, being and appearing, holidays, annoying and annoyed, pokomania, the quadrille of lancers, the people of Paris, the garden of the Tuileries , The Carnival of 1853, the Latin Quarter, the Parisian dress-up, the Parisian windows, the Parisian evenings, the Latin country, the 12 months of the year, winter fashions, the streets of Paris, Paris, festivities of May 4, 1850.

His satires of the civil or military society are sometimes grouped in albums such as the French troops, the camp of Chalons, the camp of Saint-Maur, our troopers in the Orient. In the album La Crinolomanie, Charles Vernier presents ironically the feminine fashion of the time. In the album la Rigolbochomanie, he gathers lithographic and choreographic sketches. (Wikipedia).

Price: $6,500.00

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