Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse. The FRENCH BINDERS, Titus PETRONIUS ARBITER.
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse
Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse

Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, The, In Prose and Verse

London: Printed for Sam. Briscoe, 1708. Item #05263

Early Edition in English of Petronius' Satyrical Works
In an Exquisite Signed Binding by The French Binders

FRENCH BINDERS, The. PETRONIUS ARBITER, Titus. The Satyrical Works of Titus Petronius Arbiter, In Prose and Verse. In Three Parts Together with his Life and Character, Written by Mons. St. Evremont; and A Key to the Satyr, by a Person of Quality. Made English by Mr. Wilson, Mr. Burnaby, Mr. Blount, Mr. Tho. Brown Capt. Ayloff, and several others. And adorn'd with Cuts. To which is added, The Charms of Liberty; a Poem, by the late Duke of D[evonshire]. London: Printed for Sam. Briscoe, 1708.

First edition thus, translated by John Wilson and others. Octavo (7 3/8 x 4 5/8 inches; 187 x 117 mm.). [xviii], [xvi], [xiv], 288 pp. Nine engraved plates. Bound without the additional engraved title page by Vander Gucht.
The first plate (facing p. 24) and several leaves of surrounding text with repairs to lower corners. Some marginal toning throughout. Still a very good copy in a remarkably fine and exquisite binding.

Handsomely bound ca. 1920 by The French Binders, Garden City, N.Y. (stamp signed in gilt on front turn-in). Full dark blue crushed levant morocco in the the style of seventeenth-century French binding, elaborately gilt-decorated with cover designs of three large cartouches vertically arranged and flanked by two smaller cartouches, all enclosed in horn-shaped borders. Surrounding this central motif is a ram's horn and fleur-de-lis tools on a pointillé background. Spine with five raised bands elaborately tooled and lettered in compartments. Intricate gilt board-edges and turn-ins, marbled liners and endleaves, all edges gilt. Housed in the original fleece-lined dark blue cloth clamshell case, spine lettered in gilt. A spectacular example of a turn-of-the-century American binding (case a little worn at edges).

The French Binders was the final incarnation of The Club Bindery, which became the Rowfant Club Bindery, the Booklover's Shop and finally The French Binders. Designed and tooled by Henri Hardy, Leon Maillard and Gaston Pilon.

"After the dissolution of the Club Bindery, Hardy, Maillard, and Pilon moved to Cleveland in 1909, with the establishment of the short-lived Rowfant Bindery (1909-1913), bank-rolled by Willis Vickery. The binders then were known as the Booklover's Shop bindery (1914-1917), and following a move back to New York, The French Binders
(1918-1920s) (Tom Boss. Bound to Be the Best: The Club Bindery).

This edition, collectively translated by Wilson, Burnaby, Blount, Brown, Ayloff, and others, is divided into three parts (this is the first translation into English of part three), and also includes a life of Petronius and "The Charms of Liberty". With nine full-page engravings.

The final part of the volume consists of poems, some on Petronian themes, by Thomas Brown and others. A number of the poems - including The Rope Dancer (pp. 254-5) are by Ned Ward. The very last poem is The Charms of Liberty by the first Duke of Devonshire, who had died the previous year. This may be its first printing: it was also printed separately the same year in folio (Foxon C81) as An allusion to the Bishop of Cambray's supplement of Homer; and then in 1709 under the present title (C82).

Gaius Petronius Arbiter (c. AD 27 - 66)was a Roman courtier during the reign of Nero. He is generally believed to be the author of the Satyricon, a satirical novel believed to have been written during the Neronian era (54–68 AD).
A reference to Petronius by Sidonius Apollinaris places him and/or his Satyricon in Massalia (ancient Marseille). He might have been born and educated there. Tacitus, Plutarch and Pliny the Elder describe Petronius as the elegantiae arbiter (also phrased arbiter elegantiarum), "judge of elegance", in the court of the emperor Nero. He served as suffect consul in 62. Later, he became a member of the senatorial class who devoted himself to a life of pleasure. His relationship to Nero was apparently akin to that of a fashion advisor.

Harris, 114; BMC 20, 157.

Price: $2,850.00