Item #05765 Art of Cookery, The. COOKERY, Hannah GLASSE.
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The
Art of Cookery, The

Art of Cookery, The

London: Printed for a company of booksellers, and sold by L. Wangford., 1775. Item #05765

An Early Edition of Mrs. Hannah Glasse's
The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy

GLASSE, Hannah. The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy; Which far exceeds any Thing of the Kind yet published, Containing I. How to Roast and Boil to Perfection every Thing necessary to be sent up to Table. II. Of Made Dishes. III. How expensive a French Cook's Sauce is. IV. To make a Number of pretty little Dishes for a Supper or Side-Dish, and little Corner dishes for a great Table. V. To dress Fish. VI. Of Soups and Broths. VII. Of Puddings. VIII. Of Pies. IX. For a Lent Dinner; a number of good Dishes, which you may make Use of at any other Time. X. Directions to prepare proper Food for the Sick. XI. For Captains of Ships; how to make all useful Things for a Voyage; and setting out a Table on board a Ship. XII. Of Hogs Puddings, Sausages, &c. XIII. To pot and make Hams, &c. XIV. Of Pickling. XV. Of making Cakes, &c. XVI. Of Cheesecakes, Creams, Jellies, Whip-Syllabubs, &c. XVII. Of made Wines, Brewing, French Bread, Muffins, &c. XVIII. Jarring Cherries and Preserves, &c. XIX. To make Anchovies, Vermicelli, Catchup, Vinegar, and to keep Artichokes, French Beans, &c. XX. Of Distilling. XXI. How to Market; the Season of the Year for Butchers Meat, Poultry, Fish, Herbs, Roots, and Fruit. XXII. A certain cure for the Bite of a Mad Dog. By Dr. Mead. XXIII. A Receipt to keep clear from Buggs. To which are added, one hundred and fifty new and useful receipts, and a copious index. By a lady. A New Edition with The Order of a Modern Bill of Fare, for each month, and the Manner the Dishes are to be placed upon the Table. London: Printed for a company of booksellers, and sold by L. Wangford, [1770].

Early edition. Octavo (8 1/4 x 5 inches; 209 x 127 mm.). [2, title, verso blank], [iv], [xviii, contents], [1]-298, [22, index] pp.

Contemporary sheep, rebacked. Spine with five raised bands, ruled in gilt in compartments, red morocco label lettered in gilt. Early ink inscription on front paste-down, early signature on front free endpaper, some light scattered foxing, still a very good copy of this early edition.

OCLC/KVK locates just five copies of this edition in libraries and institutions worldwide: Wright State University (OH, US); Brown University (RI, US); Case Western RSV University (OH, US); National Library of Scotland; Wellcome Library (UK).

Hannah Glasse (1708-1770) was an English cookery writer of the 18th century. Her first cookery book, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, was first published in 1747, she became one of the most famous cookbook authors of her time. It was reprinted within its first year of publication, appeared in more than twenty editions, many of which were copied without the author's consent. The book was published in Dublin in 1748 and in America from 1805. The 1751 edition was the first book to mention trifle with jelly as an ingredient and the 1758 edition gave the first mention of "Hamburgh sausages" and piccalilli. The book was popular in the Thirteen Colonies of America, and its appeal survived the American War of Independence, with copies being owned by Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. Glasse later wrote The Servants' Directory (1760) and The Compleat Confectioner (1760); neither of these titles were as commercially successful as her first book. Glasse had copied extensively from other cookery books, around a third of the recipes having been published elsewhere. Among her original recipes are the first known curry recipe written in English, as well as three recipes for pilau, an early reference to vanilla in English cuisine, the first recorded use of jelly in trifle, and an early recipe for ice cream. She was also the first to use the term "Yorkshire pudding" in print. Glasse became a dressmaker in Covent Garden - where her clients included Princess Augusta, the Princess of Wales - but she ran up excessive debts. She was imprisoned for bankruptcy and was forced to sell the copyright of The Art of Cookery. Much of Glasse's later life is unrecorded; information about her identity was lost until uncovered in 1938 by the historian Madeleine Hope Dodds. Other authors plagiarised Glasse's writing and pirated copies became common, particularly in the United States. The Art of Cookery has been admired by English cooks in the second part of the 20th century, and influenced many of them, including Elizabeth David, Fanny Cradock and Clarissa Dickson Wright.

Price: $950.00

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