Item #05766 Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book. Mary J. LINCOLN.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.
Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.

Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book.

Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1888. Item #05766

One of the First American Cook Books
To Provide Scientific Information about Nutrition and the Chemistry of Cooking

LINCOLN, Mary J. Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book. What to do and what not to do in cooking. By. Mrs. D.A. Lincoln, of the Boston Cooking School. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1888.

Fifth printing (the same pagination as the 1884 first edition).

Small octavo ( 7 3/8 x 4 7/8 inches; 187 x 124 mm.). xiv, [2, adverts], 536, [8, adverts] pp. Several woodcut illustrations in the text.

Publisher's half brown cloth over marbled boards, spine ruled in black and lettered in gilt, pale gray endpapers. Small piece (3 x 7/8 inch) torn away from front free endpaper. Binding extremities a little rubbed, otherwise a very good copy.

The milestone cookbook from Mary J. Lincoln (1844-1921) the first principal of the Boston Cooking School and a student of Maria Parloa. The work was "undertaken at the urgent request of the pupils of the Boston Cooking School, who have desired that the receipts and lessons given during the last four years in that institution should be arranged in a permanent form." Considered one of the earlier American cookbooks to provide scientific information about cooking and nutrition, it helped set the pattern of rational organization for cookbooks to come. Lincoln was also the teacher of Fannie Farmer who based her own book, the Boston Cooking School Cookbook, largely on this work.

Mary Johnson Bailey Lincoln (1844-1921) was an influential Boston cooking teacher and cookbook author. She used Mrs. D.A. Lincoln as her professional name during her husband's lifetime and in her published works; after his death, she used Mary J. Lincoln. Considered one of the pioneers of the Domestic Science movement in the United States, she was among the first to address the scientific and nutritional basis of food preparation. During her years at The Boston Cooking School, she researched and wrote Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book: What to Do and What Not to Do in Cooking, published by the Boston firm of Roberts Brothers in 1884. She later observed, "This was done primarily to meet the need of a textbook for our pupils and save the copying of recipes ..." It was one of the first American cook books to provide scientific information about nutrition and the chemistry of cooking. It also help set a pattern for the rational organization of cookbooks, and was among the first in America to provide recipes formulated with consistent measurements. It should be seen as the fore-runner to the world-famous Boston Cooking-School Cook Book by Fannie Merritt Farmer, Mrs. Lincoln's most prominent student who eventually succeeded her as principal of the Boston Cooking School. In addition, Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book included extensive advice for those who wished to operate a school of cooking in a chapter entitled "An Outline of Study for Teachers." Mrs. Lincoln touted her book as “not only a collection of recipes,” but a book “which shall also embody enough of physiology, and of the chemistry and philosophy of food, to make every principle intelligible to a child and interesting to the mature mind.”.

Price: $250.00

See all items in Cookery, Food
See all items by