Item #05707 Types Modernes. J. J. GRANDVILLE, Jean Ignace Isidore Gerard.
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes
Types Modernes

Types Modernes

Paris: Neuhaus [&] Aubert, 1835. Item #05707

J.J. Grandville's Types Modernes
A Fine Example in the Original Wrappers

GRANDVILLE, J.J. Types Modernes. Observations Critiques: Le dedans de l'Homme expliqué par le dehors. 1re livraison. (Modern Types. Critical Observations: The inside of Man explained by the outside). Paris: Neuhaus [&] Aubert, 1835-38.

Oblong folio (12 3/4 x 18 7/8 inches; 324 x 480 mm.). Nine loose sheets as issued, including frontispiece, all with superb and fascinating lithographs on papier de chine laid onto paper sheets. A few minor edge tears not affecting the illustrations on papier de chine.

Publishers pale green wrappers, lithographed front cover with title and large vignette by Grandville. Wrapper spine expertly and almost invisibly repaired.

Housed in a quarter orange morocco over marbled boards chemise which in turn is housed in an orange morocco edged over marbled boards slipcase.

The first six plates, including the frontispiece, are from the first printing published by Neuhaus in 1835. The last three bear a plate number, the mark of the second printing published by Aubert around 1838.

The frontispiece shows God, assisted by Cuvier, Lavater and Gall, on the day of the Last Judgment. "Men will be resurrected in flesh and blood, in frock coats or tailcoats, with their habits, their gestures, their canes, their umbrellas, their ties, their hats and even their boots. And women will also be resurrected in the flesh, in corsets, with their combs, their bracelets, hanging from their ears and with their twists because otherwise the Lord himself would not be able to untangle anything." The other eight plates show: Phrenological and col-logical study of the French in 1834:
19th century hat making; Variety of canes; Variety of snuffers; Variety of pipes; Animalomania (2 plates); The lay people of Paris.

According to Annie Renonciat Types Modernes was published between "décembre 1834, décembre 1836".

Exceptionally Rare. OCLC & KVK locate just one copy in libraries and institutions worldwide: The Donaueschingen copy at the University of N. Carolina, Chapel Hill (NC, US). We have been unable to trace any copies at auction over the past 100 years.
 
The Plates:

1. Frontispiece - God, assisted by Cuvier, Lavater and Gall, on the day of the Last Judgment
2. Varieté des Priseurl - Varieties of Snuff
3. Etude Phrènologique et Col-logique des Francais en 1834 - Phrenological and Logical Study of the French in 1834
4. Variètè des Pipes et de leurs Fumeurs - Variety of Pipes and their Smokers
5. Chapellerie au XIXe. Siècle (1re, Série) Chapeaux civils - Millinery in the nineteenth. Century (1st, Series) Civil Hats
6. Variètè des Cannes - Variety of Canes
7. L'Animalomanie, la prèdilection sympatico logico-physique de l'homme pour la bete. Planche 1ère
Animalomania, the sympatico logical-physical predilection of man for the beast. Plate 1st
8. L'Animalomanie, la prèdilection sympatico logico-physique de l'homme pour la bete. Planche 2me
  Animalomania, the sympatico logical-physical predilection of man for the beast. Plate 2nd
9. Les Laire, de Paris au 19me Siècle (année 1837.) - The Lay people from Paris in the 19th Century (year 1837.)

Jean Ignace Isidore Gerard (1803-1847) "was a prolific 19th century French illustrator and caricaturist who published under the pseudonym of Grandville. He has been called "the first star of French caricature's great age", and Grandville's book illustrations described as featuring "elements of the symbolic, dreamlike, and incongruous, and they retain a sense of social commentary." "His perverse vision sought the monster in everyone and took delight in the strangest and most pernicious transfigurement of the human shape ever produced by the Romantic imagination.

Grandville, Philipon, and Daumier, achieved a level of celebrity status among factions of the public, as much for their defiant opposition as their cartoons. His political cartoons enjoyed great popularity with the public and were held in high regard by many. Publishers and editors such as Edouard Charton of Le magasin pittoresque, as gave Grandville the freedom to choose his own subjects and create his images. The business of caricaturing was financially tenuous. The papers typically paid cartoonist by the print and artist considered themselves lucky to receive a contract for drawing on a regular basis. Grandville had made his earlier lithographs himself, but after he started producing cartoons for the periodicals about 1831, and his later book illustrations, he typically turned his original drawings over to publishers who had lithographers and woodcut engravers copy his images for printing."

Renonciat, pp. 99-102, 104, 108, 112, 134 & 213.

Price: $9,500.00